JENNY R. SUSSER, PH.D.

POWER & PERFORMANCE SPORT PSYCHOLOGY SERVICES

Boston Marathon

Posted by on Apr 16, 2013

The Boston Marathon events yesterday will impact us all, some more than others. How do we make sense of these tragedies in our culture now? This is not a country where these things happen so “getting our heads around it” is a distinct challenge. Try to be mindful of how you feel and how you react, especially to how others react. The young man who delivered my room service last night in the hotel in Orlando went on a bit of a rant about our government as he waited for me to sign the bill. He couldn't have been 25 and had such set, angry feelings already and was a bit too willing to share them. He had zero responsibility for himself and his feelings, they were the government's fault. I asked him if the things he said made him feel better or if they were intended to make me feel worse? My energy was passive, not at all like his, which was very strong. H

e had no idea how to answer that question because his relationship to his feelings and opinion were the most important thing and very powerful.

I like the color blue. Maybe you like red. Am I right and you're wrong? Are you right and I'm wrong? It seems like everyone is so busy being “right” about how they feel about anything that we have turned into a culture of opposition and in-fighting. Blue and red together make purple, a beautiful color that wouldn't exist on it's own…

Have your opinion and your strong feelings, that can't be avoided. But be aware that the person you are fighting or arguing with, disagreeing with, accusing, and diminishing also has powerful feelings and opinions. Are you so sure you're right? Because they are sure they are right, too? And if I like blue and you hate it, can't you still like red?

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